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3 posts from August 2014

08/05/2014

Is Consummation the Same as Closing or Settlement?

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s final rule for the integrated mortgage disclosures says the creditor must provide the Closing Disclosure to the borrower three days prior to the consummation of the transaction.

This may cause issues in the settlement industry as consummation and closing mean different things in different places. Consummation is not same as closing or settlement. (See page 51 of the CFPB's "Small Entity Compliance Guide" for the bureau's discussion on consummation.)

Consummation is the date that a consumer becomes contractually obligated to the creditor on the loan (i.e., the day they sign the note).  This is not when the consumer becomes contractually obligated to a seller on a real estate transaction.

The point in time when a consumer becomes contractually obligated to the creditor on the loan depends on applicable state law (§ 1026.2(a)(13) and Comment 2(a)(13) 1). For states that are escrow states, this could be a different date than the closing.

According to the CFPB, creditors and settlement agents should verify the applicable state laws to determine when consummation will occur, and make sure delivery of the Closing Disclosure occurs at least three business days before this event.

Loans that the Integrated Mortgage Disclosures Must be Used

Implementation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s integrated mortgage disclosures is Aug. 1, 2015. Note that there is no stagger in the roll out. All mortgage applications prior to Aug. 1, 2015 will use the current Good Faith Estimate, HUD-1 and Truth-in-Lending disclosures. All applications received on or after Aug. 1, 2015 will use the new Loan Estimate and Closing Disclosure.

The integrated mortgage disclosures apply to most consumer mortgages except:

  • Home-equity lines of credit
  • Reverse mortgages
  • Mortgages secured by a mobile home or dwelling not attached to land
  • No-interest second mortgage made for down payment assistance, energy efficiency or foreclosure avoidance
  • Loans made by a creditor who makes five or fewer mortgages in a year

Federal law does not require the use of the HUD-1 or the new Closing Disclosure in all-cash transactions. While some states have laws requiring the use of a state promulgated form in cash transactions, in general the HUD-1, the Closing Disclosure or any other settlement statement can be used in cash transactions.

How to Comply with the Closing Disclosure's Three-day Rule

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s final rule, the creditor must deliver the Closing Disclosure to the consumer at least three business days prior to the date of consummation of the transaction. (Note that the Closing Disclosure and Loan Estimate must be implemented by Aug. 1, 2015, on certain loans.

In the final rule, the CFPB said creditors may use settlement agents to provide the Closing Disclosure, provided that the settlement agents comply with the final rule’s requirements for the Closing Disclosure.

As an example, if settlement is scheduled for Thursday then the Closing Disclosure can be hand delivered on Monday. A company could also deliver the disclosure by courier or other shipping or postal service so long as a signature is obtained from the borrower showing receipt on Monday. If a company does not use a service that provides evidence that the disclosure was received on Monday (ie: U.S. Postal Service first class mail), then it must send the disclosure by the prior Thursday. Use the chart below to help you determine when the Closing Disclosure should be sent to ensure the buyer receives it three days prior to consummation of the transaction.

Generally, if changes occur between the time the Closing Disclosure form is given and the closing, the consumer must be provided a new form. When that happens, the consumer must be given three additional business days to review that form before closing.

The CFPB listened to ALTA concerns and limited the instances that would require a new Closing Disclosure to be issued. Limiting the instances of delays in real estate transactions will help to ensure a positive experience for the consumer at the closing table.

Changes that require creditors to provide a new Closing Disclosure and an additional three-business-day waiting period after receipt include:

  • changes to the APR above 1/8 of a percent for most loans (and 1/4 of a percent for loans with irregular payments or periods)
  • changes the loan product
  • addition of a prepayment penalty to the loan

Some quick definitions can be helpful when understanding this rule. First, the starting point for determining when the three-day period starts is the day of consummation. Consummation is the day the consumer becomes contractually obligated on the loan (i.e., the day they sign the note). This is typically the same day as closing (12 C.F.R. §§ 1026.2(a)(13) & 1026.38(a)(3)(ii)). Once you have the right starting point then you need to count backwards. The three-day rule requires the counting of “business days,” which are “all calendar days except Sundays and the legal public holidays specified in 5 U.S.C. 6103(a), such as New Year's Day, the Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.” It is not a 72-hour requirement, but rather a day requirement so you do not need to know the time that closing will take place.

Lastly, while the examples the CFPB provides in the rule all focus on physical delivery of the disclosure, electronic delivery is allowed in accordance with the E-SIGN or Uniform Electronic Transaction Act laws. The timing requirements are the same as for physical delivery and would require obtaining some evidence of receipt (i.e., an email confirmation, system log or other indicia) or complying with the mailbox rule for presuming receipt three days after placing the documents in the mail.

Three-day chart