50 posts categorized "Integrated Mortgage Disclosures"


TRID Q&A: Should Basic or Enhanced Rate be Quoted for Owner’s Policy?

Question: Does the TILA-RESPA Integrated (TRID) rule require that the lender disclose the basic rate for owner’s title insurance (as opposed to quoting the enhanced rate)?

Answer: As a general rule, you should disclose the basic rate for owner’s title insurance. In the Know Before You Owe rule’s Official Interpretation to § 1026.36(g)(4), it states, “The amount disclosed for an owner's title insurance premium pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(4) is based on a basic owner's policy rate, and not on an ‘enhanced’ title insurance policy premium.” However, “the creditor may instead disclose the premium for an ‘enhanced’ policy when the ‘enhanced’ title insurance policy is required by the real estate sales contract, if such requirement is known to the creditor when issuing the Loan Estimate.” Official Interpretation 37(g)(4)-1. The enhanced rate “should be disclosed as ‘Title—Owner's Title Policy (optional),’ or in any similar manner that includes the introductory description ‘Title - ’ at the beginning of the label for the item, the parenthetical description ‘(optional)’ at the end of the label, and clearly indicates the amount of the premium disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(4) is for the owner's title insurance coverage.” .” Official Interpretation 37(g)(4)-1.

Given the new definition of “application,” it is unlikely that the lender will have a copy of the sales contract available at the time the Loan Estimate is produced. Therefore, it is likely in most cases that lenders will need to disclose the cost of a basic owner’s policy. If the buyer later elects to purchase an enhanced policy rather than the basic policy, the lender can update the Loan Estimate and reset tolerances because the decision to purchase the enhanced policy would be a consumer requested change. See § 1026.19(e)(3)(iv)(C) and its accompanying Official Interpretation.

This aspect of the rule illustrates why it is so important for title agents to market directly to the consumer. The more consumers understand the value of owner’s title insurance and how it protects their property rights, the easier it will be to get them to purchase enhanced coverage. The tools in our new Homebuyer Guide are designed to help agents better connect with buyers and sell the value of an owner’s policy. You can find these tools at www.alta.org/homebuyer.

How to Comply with the Closing Disclosure's Three-day Rule

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s final rule, the creditor must deliver the Closing Disclosure to the consumer at least three business days prior to the date of consummation of the transaction. (Note that the Closing Disclosure and Loan Estimate must be implemented by Oct. 3, 2015, on certain loans.

In the final rule, the CFPB said creditors may use settlement agents to provide the Closing Disclosure, provided that the settlement agents comply with the final rule’s requirements for the Closing Disclosure.

As an example, if settlement is scheduled for Thursday then the Closing Disclosure can be hand delivered on Monday. A company could also deliver the disclosure by courier or other shipping or postal service so long as a signature is obtained from the borrower showing receipt on Monday. If a company does not use a service that provides evidence that the disclosure was received on Monday (ie: U.S. Postal Service first class mail), then it must send the disclosure by the prior Thursday. Use the chart below to help you determine when the Closing Disclosure should be sent to ensure the buyer receives it three days prior to consummation of the transaction.

Generally, if changes occur between the time the Closing Disclosure form is given and the closing, the consumer must be provided a new form. When that happens, the consumer must be given three additional business days to review that form before closing.

The CFPB listened to ALTA concerns and limited the instances that would require a new Closing Disclosure to be issued. Limiting the instances of delays in real estate transactions will help to ensure a positive experience for the consumer at the closing table.

Changes that require creditors to provide a new Closing Disclosure and an additional three-business-day waiting period after receipt include:

  • changes to the APR above 1/8 of a percent for most loans (and 1/4 of a percent for loans with irregular payments or periods)
  • changes the loan product
  • addition of a prepayment penalty to the loan

Some quick definitions can be helpful when understanding this rule. First, the starting point for determining when the three-day period starts is the day of consummation. Consummation is the day the consumer becomes contractually obligated on the loan (i.e., the day they sign the note). This is typically the same day as closing (12 C.F.R. §§ 1026.2(a)(13) & 1026.38(a)(3)(ii)). Once you have the right starting point then you need to count backwards. The three-day rule requires the counting of “business days,” which are “all calendar days except Sundays and the legal public holidays specified in 5 U.S.C. 6103(a), such as New Year's Day, the Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.” It is not a 72-hour requirement, but rather a day requirement so you do not need to know the time that closing will take place.

Lastly, while the examples the CFPB provides in the rule all focus on physical delivery of the disclosure, electronic delivery is allowed in accordance with the E-SIGN or Uniform Electronic Transaction Act laws. The timing requirements are the same as for physical delivery and would require obtaining some evidence of receipt (i.e., an email confirmation, system log or other indicia) or complying with the mailbox rule for presuming receipt three days after placing the documents in the mail.

Three-day chart


TRID Q&A: How to Handle Earnest Money at Closing

Question: It is my understanding that you may not deduct the earnest money from the real estate agent's commission any more at closing. The real estate agent must bring a check to closing for the earnest money – is this correct?

Answer: There is no prohibition in the rule that prevents the deduction of the earnest money from the real estate agent’s commission. That being said, you must disclose the amount of the commission that is paid to the real estate agent, “regardless of the identity of the party holding any earnest money deposit.” Official Interpretation 38(g)(4)-4. To comply with this requirement, you should disclose the amount of the commission and the deposit/earnest money, along with the payee of these items, on the Closing Disclosure.

Have questions or issues about TRID that you need answered? Send an email to tridhelp@alta.org. ALTA will address common questions/issues here on its blog.


How to Disclose Simultaneous Issue Rate for Know Before You Owe

Several ALTA members have reported that lenders are unsure how to calculate the owner’s title insurance premium when issued simultaneously with a lender’s policy under the CFPB’s Know Before You Owe (TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosures) rule.

The premium for an owner's title insurance policy for which a special rate may be available based on the simultaneous issuance of a lender's and an owner's policy is calculated and disclosed pursuant to § 1026.37(g)(4) as follows:

  1. The title insurance premium for a lender's title policy is based on the full premium rate, consistent with § 1026.37(f)(2) or (f)(3).
  2. The owner's title insurance premium is calculated by taking the full owner's title insurance premium, adding the simultaneous issuance premium for the lender's coverage, and then deducting the full premium for lender's coverage.” § 1026.37(g)(4)-2.

ALTA has pointed out that in the majority of states the cost of a homebuyer’s title insurance premiums will be inaccurate on the Closing Disclosure due to the CFPB’s mandatory calculation method when where the lender’s and owner’s title insurance policies are simultaneously issued. Many state regulators require settlement agents to disclose the actual costs for each fee the homebuyer is responsible for paying. ALTA developed model Settlement Statements to help settlement agents disclose the accurate costs to homebuyers.

The CFPB realizes that its calculation method will render inaccurate disclosures of the lender’s and owner’s title insurance premiums on the disclosure forms. However, the bureau feared that by disclosing the discounted rate of the lender’s policy and showing the owner’s policy at the full premium, consumers would not understand the incremental cost of purchasing an owner’s title insurance policy. Additionally, if the consumer opted not to purchase an owner’s title insurance policy, the cost of the lender’s policy would then increase substantially, resulting in a higher cost to close than anticipated by the lender and the consumer. However, despite the inaccurate disclosures of the individual costs of the premiums, the sum of the premiums under the rule’s mandated calculation will equal the sum actually charged to the consumer when the consumer pays for both the owner’s and lender’s title insurance policies.

The CFPB recognized that in situations in which the seller pays for the owner’s title insurance policy on behalf of the buyer, the Cash-to-Close figure on the Loan Estimate and Closing Disclosure will be inaccurate. In a seller-pay situation, the bureau indicated in a webinar that there are at least three ways in which the additional credit between the seller and the consumer may be disclosed on the Closing Disclosure:

  1. The remaining credit could be applied to any other title insurance cost, including the lender’s title insurance cost. (See § 1026.38(f)&(g))
  2. The remaining credit can be considered to be a general seller credit and disclosed as such in the Summaries of Transactions table on page 3 of the Closing Disclosure. (See § 1026.38(k)(2)(vii))
  3. Use of a credit specifying the remaining amount for the owner’s title insurance cost in the Summaries of Transactions table on page 3 of the Closing Disclosure. (See § 1026.38(k)(2)(viii)). This credit could be disclosed as a “simultaneous issue credit” in the Summaries of Transactions.

It is important to note that this information does not represent legal interpretation, guidance or advice of the bureau, and should not be used as a substitute for the rule. Only the rule and its Official Interpretations can provide complete and definitive information regarding requirements.

it is important to note that this presentation does not represent legal interpretation, guidance or advice of the bureau, and should not be used as a substitute for the rule. Only the rule and its Official Interpretations can provide complete and definitive information regarding requirements. - See more at: http://blog.alta.org/page/2/#sthash.pTpnZLe8.dpuf

TRID Q&A: How to Handle Recording Fees

Question: I have a question about recording fees on the CD. It is my understanding that recording fees are required to be “rolled up” so to speak in line E 01 since the only two items that the regulations allow to be itemized are for the deed and mortgage and that we are not permitted to add lines for other recording fees (for example the recording fee for a municipal lien certificate or a discharge of mortgage or an assignment of mortgage). So for example, in the CFPB sample CD for a purchase transaction, if there are other recording fees other than for the deed and mortgage, those fees must be added to the box where the figure $85 is represented in the sample form.

Answer: This is a precise understanding of the rule’s requirements on disclosing recording fees. Specifically, the rule requires that all recording fees and other government fees and taxes, outside of transfer taxes, must be added together and labeled “Recording Fees and Other Taxes” under the subheading “Taxes and Other Government Fees.” § 1026.37(g)(1)(i). The bureau clearly states within the Official Interpretations of the rule that no lines can be added or deleted under the “Taxes and Other Government Fees” subheading. Official Interpretation 37(g)(1)-6.

The bureau has also specifically stated that you cannot use an addendum to itemize fees that are required to be disclosed under the “Taxes and Other Government Fees” subheading. § 1026.37(g)(8). If you are required by state law, or simply would like, to make additional disclosures for recording fees or other government fees or taxes, you may disclose those fees in a separate document, such as the ALTA Settlement Statement.

Have questions or issues about TRID that you need answered? Send an email to tridhelp@alta.org. ALTA will address common questions/issues here on its blog.



Is Borrower Required to Sign Updated Version of Closing Disclosure?

The short answer is that it depends on the lender. So, settlement agents should read their closing instructions carefully. Generally, when a disclosure becomes inaccurate within three days before consummation and a new three day period is not required, TRID requires the lender to correct the disclosure and ensure the consumers receives the disclosure at or before closing. 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2)(i).

Each lender will have different requirements for how they will want to correct disclosures, the timing for sending them to consumers and the documentation they will require for compliance purposes.

It is a safe bet that if the lender requires some documentation of receipt for the original Closing Disclosure, they will likely require the same protocol for corrected disclosures.


Questions About TRID?

Have questions or issues about TRID that you need answered? Send an email to tridhelp@alta.org. ALTA will address common questions/issues here on its blog


Rep. Hill: We Can't Defend Bureaucratic Intransigence at the Expense of our Home-Buying Public

During a hearing Sept. 14 before the House Financial Services Committee, U.S. Rep. French Hill encouraged Congress to pass legislation that would provide for limited liability for those who in good faith attempt to comply with the new TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure (TRID) requirements that go into effect Oct. 3.

On July 9, the House Financial Services Committee passed legislation introduced by Hill that would extend the hold-harmless period until Feb. 1, 2016. The Homebuyers Assistance Act (H.R. 3192) also says that no lawsuit may be filed against a person for a violation of the TRID rule occurring before such date, so long as the person has made a good faith effort to comply with the rule.

During the hearing, Hill said that some 230,000 Americans refinance or buy a new home every month and “they’re going to be the ones who are victimized by this confusing rule that doesn’t get implemented properly due to a technology reason or a misunderstanding at a real estate brokerage, or a title company, or a bank.”

“I hope we can (pass H.R. 3192) before October 3, so that our title (companies), commercial banks, mortgage bankers, real estate agents all have some confidence that they can go into this new closing regime and not be penalized, either by the federal government or through civil liability,” Hill added. “We can't defend bureaucratic intransigence at the expense of our home-buying public.”

ALTA has joined 17 other industry groups urging federal regulators to provide formal guidance on how regulators plan to enforce TRID for the initial months following implementation on Oct. 3.

The letter asks the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) “to implement a clearly articulated transition period that addresses how regulators will oversee and examine regulated institutions for TRID compliance during this transition period.”

Without clear guidance, it’s expected access to mortgage credit will be constrained due to fear of enforcement actions for errors committed in good faith. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has said it will be sensitive to those making good-faith efforts to comply.

“Transitioning to the new TRID regulatory framework is a sea change for every participant in the mortgage lending,” the letter stated. “Industry stakeholders have undertaken extensive efforts to comply with these rules, but, even now, they are discovering significant compliance issues. These discoveries raise liability concerns that cannot be realistically resolved before the October 3 deadline, as many will require formal authoritative guidance.”

The letter also asked the FFIEC to recognize the severe penalties that can arise under these new rules. Because of this, the groups asked that the FFIEC announce guidelines that would provide institutions making a good-faith effort to comply relief from enforcement for a reasonable period following Oct. 3.

Joining ALTA on the letter were American Bankers Association, American Escrow Association, The Appraisal Firm Coalition, Appraisal Institute, Collateral Risk Network, Consumer Bankers Association, Community Home Lenders Association, Consumer Mortgage Coalition, Community Mortgage Lenders, Credit Union National Association, Housing Policy Council, Independent Community Bankers of America, Mortgage Bankers Association, National Association of Home Builders, National Association of Mortgage Brokers, National Association of Realtors and Real Estate Services Providers Council.

The Title Action Network has asked members to take action and urge their representatives to co-sponsor and vote yes on H.R. 3192.


Webinar Recording: TRID Ready? This Is What It Looks Like

If you’re looking for last minute tips to help get your operation ready for the Oct. 3 implementation of TRID, check out a recording of ALTA’s Title Topics webinar for advice from lenders, title/settlement agents and technology experts. The webinar also addresses what your real estate partners and consumers should know about the new closing process.

Webinar handouts:



Realtors Confident in Title Companies’ TRID Preparedness

Realtors have a high degree of confidence that the title companies they work with are prepared for implementation of the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosures (TRID), which go into effect Oct. 3.


According to a survey by the National Association of Realtors, 75 percent of the 1,432 Realtors surveyed are confident that title companies will avoid issues that trigger a delay under the new TRID rules. Those surveyed rated confidence on a scale from one to five. Realtors’ confidence in lenders was 65 percent.

The distribution for title companies was skewed more toward a five rating, or high degree of confidence, for title companies with 41 percent of respondents giving their title partners this rating. Meanwhile, only 27 percent of Realtors gave the highest rating to lenders, according to the survey.

“Results of this survey reinforce the dedication to quality service that title professionals provide to their business partners and consumers every day,” said Michelle Korsmo, ALTA’s chief executive officer. “For more than two years, we have encouraged our members to initiate conversations and collaborate with their Realtor and mortgage lender partners to ensure the implementation of the new forms is seamless. ALTA and its members have been engaged in the conversation and attending conventions, forums and webinars to learn how TRID will change the closing process. It will take a collaborative effort from all of the stakeholders who participate in the transaction to help consumers better understand their terms when they buy a home or refinance their mortgage.”

When asked about their own preparedness, Realtors only 23 percent gave themselves a five rating, while 71 percent rated their readiness a three or better.

When asked about their plans to deal with TRID, 56 percent of Realtors indicated they plan to alter purchase agreements to reflect a longer timeline, while 31 percent will add contingencies to the contract. Additionally, 37 percent indicated they have developed plans with their lenders and title company to help smooth the process.

According to the survey, a quarter of Realtors plan to complete inspections earlier in the process while 31 percent plan to share contracts and amendments earlier in the process with lenders, title insurers and closing agents. This is something ALTA members have encouraged leading up to implementation.